Read Alikes — Eleanor & Park

Readers have expressed overwhelming enthusiasm for Eleanor & Park . If you liked Rainbow Rowell’s super-real portrayal of high-school life and relationships (and more!), you’ll definitely want to read her latest book, Fangirl.

We’ve compiled a list of read-alikes — some obvious, some not-so-obvious — to fill the void left by Eleanor & Park:

Fangirl by Rainbow RowellFANGIRL by Rainbow Rowell (2013)

“Cath is a Simon Snow fan. OK, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan, but for Cath, being a fan is her life-and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving.

“Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to. Now that they’re going to college, Wren has told Cath she doesn’t want to be roommates. Cath is on her own, completely outside of her comfort zone. She’s got a surly roommate with a charming, always-around boyfriend, a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is the end of the civilized world, a handsome classmate who only wants to talk about words . . . And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who’s loving and fragile and has never really been alone.

“For Cath, the question is: Can she do this? Can she make it without Wren holding her hand? Is she ready to start living her own life? Writing her own stories? And does she even want to move on if it means leaving Simon Snow behind?”  (Source: rainbowrowell.com)

 

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler (2011)Why-We-Broke-Up-by-Daniel-Handler

I’m telling you why we broke up, Ed. I’m writing it in this letter, the whole truth of why it happened.

“Min Green and Ed Slaterton are breaking up, so Min is writing Ed a letter and giving him a box. Inside the box is why they broke up. Two bottle caps, a movie ticket, a folded note, a box of matches, a protractor, books, a toy truck, a pair of ugly earrings, a comb from a motel room, and every other item collected over the course of a giddy, intimate, heartbreaking relationship. Item after item is illustrated and accounted for, and then the box, like a girlfriend, will be dumped.” (Source: Amazon.ca)

 

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Steven Chbosky  The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky (1999)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a story about what it’s like to travel that strange course through the uncharted territory of high school. The world of first dates, family dramas, and new friends. Of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Of those wild and poignant roller-coaster days known as growing up.”

(Source: Amazon.ca)

 

 

 

The Big Crunch by Pete HautmanThe Big Crunch by Pete Hautman (2011)

“Jen and Wes do not ‘meet cute.’ They do not fall in love at first sight. They do not swoon with scorching desire. They do not believe that they are instant soul mates destined to be together forever. This is not that kind of love story.

“Instead, they just hang around in each other’s orbits…until eventually they collide. And even after that happens, they’re still not sure where it will go. Especially when Jen starts to pity-date one of Wes’s friends, and Wes makes some choices that he immediately regrets.

“From National Book Award winner Pete Hautman, this is a love story for people not particularly biased toward romance. But it is romantic, in the same way that truth can be romantic and uncertainty can be the biggest certainty of all.”  (Source: Amazon.ca)

 

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman AlexieThe Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie (2007)

“Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he thought he was destined to live.”  (Source: Amazon.com)

 

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Posted on April 24, 2014, in Read-Alikes and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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